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Analysis | Apr 01, 2020
Is a non-interference pact between Russia and the U.S. feasible given the current state of their relationship? What might such a pact look like and, more importantly, what should it address?
Post | Mar 27, 2020
How much do Russians miss the USSR and how many of them would like Russia to emulate Soviet ways?

The Levada Center has been tracking answers to these questions for 28 years and its latest poll shows 65 percent of Russians regret the disintegration of the Soviet Union. Although this number has decreased by 1 percent from the previous year’s data, this response still represents a significant increase from a low of 49 percent in 2012 (See Table 1). Three-quarters of Russian respondents agreed to some extent that “the Soviet epoch was the best time in the history of our country, with a high level of welfare and opportunities for common citizens.” Such a strong fondness for the Soviet epoch is especially remarkable given that the percentage of Russia’s adult population with concrete memories of the Soviet Union keeps decreasing—about 35 percent of Russia’s current population was born since 1991 according to U.N. estimates.
Digest | Mar 27, 2020
Event | Apr 11, 2020
Join Harvard's Davis Center for an online negotiations simulation on Georgia's political, security and humanitarian situation. 
Post | Mar 26, 2020
As cases of COVID-19 rise around the globe, upending daily life and forcing much of the world into pandemic-related lockdowns or other restrictions, many are wondering when the outbreak may peak in their countries and some sort of return to normal may begin. One person who correctly predicted the peak of the virus in China is Nobel prize winner Michael Levitt—and he predicts that the worst of the outbreak in the rest of the world will be over sooner than many health experts believe.

Levitt correctly forecast both the number of cases and the number of deaths in China, saying at the end of February that China’s cases would total around 80,000 with approximately 3,250 deaths. As of March 16, China had reported 80,298 cases total and 3,245 deaths. In making his prediction, Levitt focused not on the number of new daily cases, but on the rate at which they increased. “The fact that new cases were being identified at a slower rate was more telling than the number of new cases itself. It was an early sign that the trajectory of the outbreak had shifted,” the Los Angeles Times reports.   
Analysis | Mar 25, 2020
China could be the major beneficiary from the oil price war, but for key oil producers and exporters the question is who is worse off and will be first to fold.
Digest | Mar 20, 2020
Post | Mar 20, 2020
A popular talking point for many watchers of U.S.-Russian relations is to warn that reduced communication between the two countries, caused by the enduring animosities between Moscow and Washington, are increasing risks of a misunderstanding that could cause the world’s two nuclear superpowers to stumble into war. The experts, such as Sam Nunn and Ernest Moniz, certainly have a point. The less Washington and Moscow communicate, the greater the risk of misinterpreting each other’s actions in a way that could lead to a conflict, which could ultimately escalate into a nuclear war. You would be surprised, however, how much the U.S. and Russia still communicate both on government and non-government levels in spite of the animosities. At least that’s the impression I got when I looked into it, compiling a list of such communications. From checking on each other’s strategic nukes to co-managing polar bear populations, the U.S. and Russia are still talking to each other, even though they might be talking past each other.